Books and Artwork For Sale

testing here

Saturday, June 18, 2011

Tickled

Google has a neat search engine which allows us to search the internet to see on which websites our images are used. Here's a few interesting sites using drawings I made:

Micheal O. Tunnel's children's book Moon Without Magic. This fascinating book uses part of an illustration I made called A Little Near East Town.

This picture sold alot during the Muslim month of fasting known as Ramadan. Here's some information about Mr. O. Tunnel's book:

The lamp is gone! Aminah can't believe her eyes when she opens her hidden closet to find the jinni's vessel missing. As much as she hates to suspect her dear friend Idris, he is the only one who knows how to access the magic lamp, and now he has run off. But somehow Jinni is left behind, trapped outside the lamp and devoid of his powers. He is traumatized by this event and finds himself changing from acting like Omar, the kindly uncle Aminah trained him to be, and Gindar, the greedy gambler he was back in his human days. When Aminah and Jinni set off after Idris, Aminah wonders which one of Jinni's personalities will accompany her on the journey--and how they will ever manage without magic. As it turns out, they must rely on wits, bravery, luck, and a bit of sorcery from an unexpected source in order to survive thieving bandits, pirates, and their biggest challenge of all: Princess Badr, who seeks not only the lamp, but also revenge.

This French language website GreenEtVert used my Staring At Death illustration in a story about fossil fuel pollution in our precious oceans. They were also very gracious to give me a credit under the image. In today's "if it's on the internet it's gotta be free" mindset, I was surprised (and grateful).

Next, was a big surprise. My best-selling royalty-free illustration, Boulders, was used by a roofing company as its logo. The Ohio-based White Rocks Roof Services seemed to really like it!

The most distressing part of my discoveries, however, is that many of the religious themes which promote positive images of Muslims are used on so-called Muslim websites that did not purchase the image. Some of them still have the watermarks imbedded by the agency from which the blogger stole it—thank God! I will not share those here because I don't like to promote this kind of conduct.